Daily archives "January 30, 2017"

T2 Trainspotting *****


Running time 117 mins Cert: 18

Synopsis: First there was an opportunity……then there was a betrayal. Twenty years have gone by. Much has changed but just as much remains the same. Mark Renton (McGregor) returns to the only place he can ever call home.They are waiting for him: Spud (Bremner), Sick Boy (Miller) Begbie Carlyle). Other old friends are waiting too: sorrow, loss, joy, vengeance, hatred, friendship, love, longing, fear, regret, diamorphine, self-destruction and mortal danger, they are all lined up to welcome him, ready to join the dance.
Almost 21 years since the release of the original made such an impact, there some  fearful in-trepidation whether the cast and crew could pull off a worthy sequel. The answer is thankfully a big Yes.

Screenwriter John Hodge  and Director Danny Boyle have made a great decision not not make the second film more of the same, but make the sequel a contained story that reminisces the first film. The are new scenarios which have glimpses of the past within images or even just through the music.

The central theme is one of regret within the script which partially based on Irvine Welsh’s sequel ‘Porno’ and also has elements from the ‘Trainspotting’novel itself. Each character no better off since Renton left them with the money.

Sickboy has lost the lust of life and adventurous spirit he always had, becoming a bitter and cynical middle aged man. Renton has self loathing and even has a new version of the Choose Life speech which is more powerful this time around. While Spud is still a junkie, he has lost his family, his home and what was left of his self respect. While Begbie has been locked up for killing a man and has not changed at all in all those years.

The film has more drama, but still has comedic elements which mostly revolve around Spud and Begbie. But Sickboy and Renton do have the best scene in the film revolving around the year 1690, which is hilarious. While the plot of the friends helping to assist Sick Boy with his new business venture in a Sauna is not as developed as it could be.

All the main cast provide the same great performances. Other characters from the original including James Cosmo, Shirley Henderson and Kelly MacDonald also return, but have very limited screen time. While this may seem to be pointless and bring no benefit to the story, they do serve purpose within the narrative.

Danny Boyle yet again provides bold and energetic direction inspired by the auteur Nic Roeg, by using all sorts of camera tricks which merge this new film with scenes from the original.

Even the soundtrack mixes the old with the new. In the present the sounds include Mercury-winning Edinburgh alt hip-hop trio Young Fathers, Brixton  rockers Fat White Family, alternative indie Londoners Wolf Alice and the funny demented Irish rappers Rubberbandits. While classic songs are provided by Blondie, Queen and Run DMC. Iggy Pop’s ‘Lust for Life’ makes a welcome return in the form of a Prodigy remix and Underworld’s make an alternative version of their hit song with ‘Slow Slippy’.

Not quite as dark or as funny as the original, but as sequels go this a welcome success and almost as good as the first. A bit long and sentimental at times. Nevertheless it is funny and entertaining. 

Reviewed by Paul Logan