World War Z ***

 

Unknown

 

Run Time: 116 mins         Cert: 15

 

Synopsis: Former UN employee Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) attempts to save the world from zombies in Marc Forster’s latest horror film.

 

At the beginning of the film Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) and his wife Karin (Mirielle Enos) are taking their two daughters to school when Philadelphia is attacked by people who appear to have a lethal virus. As those around them are killed and the city is destroyed, the family escape in a camper van and hide in a block of flats. As they wait for a helicopter to rescue them, they are joined by a young boy named Tommy whose parents have succumbed to the virus. Following this, they are taken to a US Navy Vessel where Gerry is persuaded to help find the source of the virus in exchange for keeping his family safe.

 

The film follows the team of soldiers to locations all over the world including South Korea, Israel and South Wales. As they travel around attempting to identify where the virus has come from, the team accompanying Gerry are gradually killed leaving only Gerry and a woman named Segen (Daniella Kertesz) whom he has saved from death by removing her hand. Despite almost being killed themselves, the pair finally identify the source of the virus and find a way of preventing it.

 

“World War Z” is nicely shot and the 3D is excellent. There are some spectacular shots of cities from above that show the true advantages of 3D. The scenes in which the infected people morph and attack also benefit from this as it gives the impression the audience could walk into the screen.

 

The film is let down by a story that starts well but loses its way in the third act. It is fairly obvious the film has been edited a lot and the acts have been thrown together. This results in “World War Z” feeling somewhat like two separate movies. The ending is also disappointing and feels a bit too perfect.

 

Although it features good performances from Pitt, Enos and the supporting cast, the characters in the movie are not particularly memorable. Again their development may have suffered due to the excessive editing that has taken place throughout its lifetime but it would have been nice to see characters with more depth and “human like” features to complement a story that is predominantly driven by events.

 

Overall, the film has its strong points, particularly during the first two acts. However the lack of structure in the third act, lack of character development and cliched ending let it down.

 

Reviewed by Lesley Logan

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