Daily archives "January 23, 2013"

Django Unchained *****

django-unchained

Running Time: 165 mins Certificate: 18

Synopsis: In 1858, bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz (Waltz) frees a slave called Django (Foxx) to help him track down three outlaw brothers. The bounty hunter agrees to help his new companion rescue Django’s wife (Washington) from a plantation owner (DiCaprio).

 

After returning with the great Inglorious Bastards, Tarantino makes his long talked about western which is extremely fun and in true style as you would expect from this auteur very violent. As can be expected the story is less historical fact and more played out like a comic book, but this is no bad thing. The only major change is that the director follows a linear narrative instead of his usual time twisting plot. Unfortunately the length of the piece is still too long, but does not hamper the movie as a whole.

 

The script is full of funny moments for instance the scene involving the Klu Klux Clan. But Tarantino also puts in enough factual things including Mandingo fighting to keep the balance from making it completely ridiculous in tone.

 

Yet again the director has lined up a wonderful cast mixed with actors that he has used in previous films with stars that have long since been forgotten by audiences, in particular Don Johnson.

 

The main antagonist, Leonardo DiCaprio takes on his most interesting role as a despicable racist incestuous, Calvin J. Candie.  DiCaprio brings a terrifying unbalanced mixture of menace and humour to the character. While Samuel L. Jackson as Stephen, the ‘Uncle Tom’ head servant at Candie’s plantation scene steals at every opportunity he is on screen. Jackson comes across a sadistic Benson and is certainly his best role in years.

 

While Christoph Waltz steals from the lead. Jamie Foxx is disappointingly bland and underplays Django by just playing every action and line straight.

 

Tarantino is like Marmite. Love him or hate him, this film is simply a breathtaking and undeniable accomplishment. Overall a fantastic addition to the director’s work.

 

Reviewed by Paul Logan