Hanna ***

Running time: 111 mins  Certificate: 12A

Synopsis: Hanna (Ronan) has been trained to be an assassin by her father. She’s goes on the run from the CIA in and is closely followed by Marissa (Blanchett), who knows who or what she really is.

 

Director Joe Wright changes course after Atonement and The Soloist with a modern day fairy tale orientated action flick. But unfortunately the end result is a mixed bag of tricks and strangely rather boring at the same time.

The major problem with the film is the script, which has too many plot-holes and asks more questions than it answers. Why do Hanna and her father not just keep on living the way they have been, essentially under the nose of Blanchett’s witch character? Why give Hanna the choice of flicking a switch to become detectable? Out of the resources available to the C.I.A., why does Marissa resort to hiring a blonde camp assassin with a skinhead thug? Surely these characters would stand out a mile?

Also the family that Hanna encounters are supposed to be funny and kooky, but are just plain annoying. The stroppy teen daughter in particular is irritating and it is a wonder that Hanna doesn’t want to break her neck in the end. These scenes also slow the pace of the film down.

What does work are mainly the performances with both Eric Bana and Cate Blanchett giving bringing a heightened intensity to the game of cat and mouse that their characters are playing. Tom Hollander as the blonde assassin is given the best lines. While Saoirse Ronan proves again that she has a great career ahead with her mesmerising turn in the lead role.

Another aspect that works is the soundtrack by The Chemical Brothers which drives the action sequences. Although it is not nearly as good as the work Daft Punk contributed towards the Tron Legacy Soundtrack. 

There was a good idea somewhere within the Run Lola Run, Bourne Identity, Leon with a touch of Brothers Grim mash up. But there are too many problems with the overcooked plot. However Wright shows that he can direct action scenes and the performances shine throughout.

 

Reviewed by Paul Logan

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